Employment-based health insurance and job mobility
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Employment-based health insurance and job mobility is there evidence of job-lock? by Brigitte C. Madrian

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Insurance, Health -- United States.,
  • Employee fringe benefits -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBrigitte C. Madrian.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper no. 4476, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 4476.
ContributionsNational Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination33, [12] p. ;
Number of Pages33
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22435668M

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The Past. The most familiar aspect of employment-based insurance’s past is its rapid growth in the first three decades after World War II, the relative stability that followed for about a decade Cited by: Get this from a library! Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is There Evidence ofJob-Lock?. [Brigitte C Madrian; National Bureau of Economic Research.;] -- This paper assesses the impact of employer-provided health insurance on job mobility by exploring the extent to which workers are 'locked' into their jobs because preexisting conditions exclusions. Downloadable! This paper assesses the impact of employer-provided health insurance on job mobility by exploring the extent to which workers are 'locked' into their jobs because preexisting conditions exclusions make it expensive for individuals with medical problems to relinquish their current health insurance. I estimate the degree of job-lock by comparing the difference in the turnover rates. EMPLOYMENT-BASED HEALTH INSURANCE AND JOB MOBILITY: IS THERE EVIDENCE OF JOB-LOCK?* BRIGITTE C. MADRIAN This paper assesses the impact of employer-provided health insurance on job mobility by exploring the extent to which workers are "locked" into their jobs because preexisting conditions exclusions make it expensive for individuals with.

Downloadable (with restrictions)! This paper assesses the impact of employer-provided health insurance on job mobility by exploring the extent to which workers are "locked" into their jobs because preexisting conditions exclusions make it expensive for individuals with medical problems to relinquish their current health insurance. I estimate the degree of job-lock by comparing the difference. Overview. Because the greatest source of insurance for most Americans is Employer Provided Health Insurance (EPHI) and an employee cannot take their EPHI with them when they leave their job, benefits-related job lock is a concern in the United States.. The nonportability of EPHI is what causes workers to get locked into their present jobs, hence the term job lock.   Updated October 20 For the most up-to-date information on health insurance, visit our health insurance guide.. Despite all the talk about the health insurance marketplace, most people still get their health insurance through their employers. But a big downside to accepting your job-based health insurance plan is that you don’t get to shop around – you’re limited to one or a few. October Trends in employment-based health insurance coverage: evidence from the National Compensation Survey. Data from the BLS National Compensation Survey show that access to employer-provided health insurance declined from to , chiefly because of Author: Keenan Dworak-Fisher, Maury Gittleman, Thomas Moehrle.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of , provided the first major health care reform in 45 years. The so-called Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted to provide high-quality, affordable health care for all Americans.   A second major shortcoming of employment-based health insurance is that it is only temporary. It is tied to a particular job in a particular company, and it is lost with that job. Nowhere else in the industrialized world does a family, already down on its luck over a job loss, also suffer the loss of its health insurance.   More than half of the U.S. population ( percent) had employment-based health insurance coverage in , and among the employed population aged 18 to 64, over two-thirds ( percent) had health insurance through their own employer or another person’s employer. 1 In addition, over one-third ( percent) of individuals who did not work received coverage through employment . This paper assesses the impact of employer-provided health insurance on job mobility by exploring the extent to which workers are 'locked' into their jobs because preexisting conditions exclusions.