Sterilization of marine mammal pool waters
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Sterilization of marine mammal pool waters theoretical and health considerations by Stephen H. Spotte

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service in [Washington, DC?] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Marine mammals,
  • Zoo animals,
  • Water -- Purification,
  • Water quality management

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Stephen Spotte.
SeriesTechnical bulletin -- no. 1797., Technical bulletin (United States. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service) -- no. 1797.
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 59 p. :
Number of Pages59
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17619434M
OCLC/WorldCa25223884

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Spotte, Stephen H. , Sterilization of marine mammal pool waters [electronic resource]: theoretical and health considerations / by Stephen Spotte U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service [Washington, D.C.?] Wikipedia Citation. In October , APHIS published Sterilization of Marine Mammal Pool Waters: Theoretical and Health Considerations, by Stephen Spotte (USDA Tech. Bull. ). In June , APHIS spon- sored a symposium with the John G. Shedd Aquarium in Chicago and the Chicago Zoological Park (Brookfield Zoo) in Brookfield, IL, on water quality for marine mammals. Sterilization of marine mammal pool waters: theoretical and health considerations / By Stephen H Spotte. Abstract. Mode of access: Internet Topics: Water quality management, Water, Zoo animals, Captive marine mammals Author: Stephen H Spotte. Spotte, S. (). Sterilization of marine mammal pool waters: theoretical and health considerations. USDA Series Technical bulletin no. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Washington D.C. Stephan, U. (). Untersuchungen an Eisbaeren in europäischen zoologischen Gärten: Verhalten und Veränderungen von Stresshormon-Konzentrationen unter.

  Sterilization of Marine Mammal Pool Waters; Exotic Animals. Advisory Notice: Limiting close contact between members of the public and nondomestic cats during the COVID Pandemic; Proper Giraffe Care in Cold Weather [Tech Note] Tuberculosis in Elephants: Science, Myths, and Beyond! [ Seminar] Comparable Standards Evaluation For Foreign. At first glance, the question of fecal contamination in marine-mammal water systems seems straightforward enough. Marine mammals spend most, if not all, of their lives in the water, eating.   Animal Welfare Act and Regulations [The “Blue Book”] Marine Mammal Final Rule; Licensing and Registration under the Animal Welfare Act: Guidelines for Dealers, Exhibitors, Transporters, and Researchers [September ] Animal Welfare Inspection Guide; Animal Care Creates New Process for Appealing Animal Welfare Act Inspection Report. Marine mammals feed at a variety of trophic levels from herbivore to top predator. The sirenians are herbivores and eat sea grass that grows in coastal waters of the tropics. Several marine mammals specialize on benthic prey. The walrus feeds primarily on benthic mollusks; sea otters feed on benthic mollusks, echinoderms and decapod crustaceans.

Its use in marine aquaria is widespread, and it is being used more and more in large marine mammal pools. Ozone is produced on site; as it is a gas with low solubility in water, it needs to be mixed well in the filter system before returning the water to the pool Because of its poor solubility, it has the advantage of not producing residues in. Sterilization of Marine Mammal Pool Waters. Book. Full-text available. Jan ; Stephen Spotte. View. Design of a rapid-flow seawater supply system for the university of Connecticut's marine. Spotte S. Sterilization of Marine Mammal Pool Waters - Theoretical and Health Considerations. United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Technical Bulletin No. , Stephens B. Conditioning behavior for husbandry purposes. (2) When the water is chemically treated, the chemicals shall be added so as not to cause harm or discomfort to the marine mammals. (3) Water samples shall be taken and tested at least weekly for coliform count and at least daily for pH and any chemical additives (e.g. chlorine and copper) that are added to the water to maintain water quality.